What is Antitrust?

Antitrust refers to the government policy for dealing with monopoly.
Antitrust laws aim to stop abuses of market power by big companies and, sometimes, to prevent corporate mergers and acquisition, that would create or strengthen a monopolist.
There have been big differences in antitrust policies both among countries and within the same country over time. This has reflected different ideas about what constitutes a monopoly and, where there is one, what sorts of behaviour are abusive.

Antitrust laws are statutes developed by governments to protect consumers from predatory business practices and ensure fair competition.

Antitrust laws are applied to a wide range of questionable business activities, including market allocation, bid rigging, price fixing, and monopolies.

Core U.S. antitrust law was created by three pieces of legislation: the Sherman Anti-Trust Act of 1890, the Federal Trade Commission Act, and the Clayton Antitrust Act.